Monday, November 29, 2010

Transforming the Antagonist


My apologies for leaving many of you halfway through a conversation on your blogs but I had to take the computer back to the doctors.

Again.

For anyone who’s counting, yes, that is the third time this year and I do think they should have given me balloons.

Rant over.

I’m fascinated by a writer’s ability to turn a strong antagonist into a protagonist. It’s not an easy task. If the transformation is too quick, the audience won’t have enough empathy for the character. If the transformation is too slow or lacking in foundation, he won’t appear redeemable to the audience who will suspect that any behavior changes serve a dark agenda that has yet to be identified.

A great example of this appears in The Vampire Diaries, which was recently recommended to me. I should mention here, due to characterization differences, that I am referring to the TV series rather than the books in this instance.

The series includes a love triangle between two vampire brothers and the heroine (bear with me). One of the brothers is essentially evil and seemingly remorseless. However, as the series continues he is redeemed to the audience through his love for the heroine and quirky sense of humor. Ultimately the audience should still be horrified by him based on past transgression but the writers have revealed enough to enable an audience to empathize with his tortured past and want him to get his girl.

I don’t believe that every person could watch the transformation in the series and find themselves tugged onto this character’s side. But the purpose is there and it’s intriguing to note the little elements that go into such a change over many episodes, particularly since it revolves entirely around his behavior toward the heroine and the behavior that she inspires in him. Ain’t love a pretty thing?

What do you think of antagonist transformations?


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Thursday, November 18, 2010

It's That Time of Year



 Alrighty! So I’m back.

I’ve pretended to start my Christmas shopping where the shop decorations are already in place. They’re pretty and sparkling and, let’s face it, a little unsettling. The idea of strolling around under giant presents and ornaments that are beautifully lit but have the potential to both squash and mildly electrocute you is something I try not to think about while I’m getting the groceries.

Here’s to hoping that the guys who ridged them up weren’t having a “blah-whatever-that’ll do” day?

Does anyone else have a certain book/s they read at this time of year? I have some favorite M&B that must come out this and last year I added The Millionaire’s Mistletoe Mistress by Natalie Anderson. It was such a fun read where Natalie’s heroine, Imogen gets to wrap all sorts of things for her gorgeous hero. I’m especially looking forward to reading that one again. If you’re interested, it’s been released in the US this year as ‘Tis the Season” also including stories by Carole Mortimer and Alison Roberts and will still be available at http://www.eharlequin.com/.

I know you’re all writing furiously and refusing to cook dinner for your families all in the name of NaNoWriMo. Congrats! Is anyone writing a Christmas themed book for NaNo? Is anyone entering their NaNo in the So You Think You Can Write challenge?

Go on! Take advantage of those overworked editors! ;)



P.S. Mills and Boon author has been interviewed Christina Hollis over at the Minxes and you can read it here.
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Tuesday, November 2, 2010

NV Competition Ends & NaNoWriMo Begins


A huge congratulations to Leah Ashton for her winning NV entry Secrets & Speed Dating! Congratulations also to Lindsay, Carrie &a Heidi for their Top 4 entries!

When one door closes a window opens and that window is NaNoWriMo! Good luck to everyone whose fingers will be furiously typing a masterpiece. I’ll be watching your word meters soar!


P.S I’m going to be a sporadic blogger for another 10 days. Yes that’s a very specific 10 days and then I’ll be back to harass you all as much as I want ;)
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